Agricultural Advances: Top Ways to Improve Your Farm

Agricultural Advances: Top Ways to Improve Your Farm

Running a business in the agricultural sector can be tricky, and trying to run a farm is one the trickiest of all. You can put so much focus on keeping things ticking over that you forget that there are other things that need to be done. Below, you’ll find top ways to advance your farm and turn into something more profitable and more forward-thinking. So, get ready to move your business into the future today.

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Eating More Sustainably Doesn't Need To Be A Chore!

Eating More Sustainably Doesn't Need To Be A Chore!

It pretty much goes without saying that everyone wants to do everything that they can in order to avoid having too much of a negative impact on the environment. Sustainability has become more and more of an issue in many people's lives over the last few years, and there are few places where people could stand to become more sustainable than their diet. The problem is that a lot of people assume that a sustainable diet that reduces their impact on the environment is going to take a lot of hard work and take away all of the things that made meals so enjoyable. In reality, this couldn't be further from the truth. Here are just a few ways that you can create a more sustainable diet for yourself and your family without it having to become a total chore.

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Farming On A Budget - Tips For Keeping Livestock Costs Down

Image from Pixabay

Image from Pixabay

Farmers have a reputation for being fairly thrifty and frugal. Even though they can get a lot of financial help from the government, they still need to carefully watch their pennies as the everyday costs of farming can be extremely high. And one of the most expensive parts of running a successful farm is taking good care of livestock. If the costs of livestock creep up, it can be very difficult to make a profit on the animals. So, it is always important for farmers to try and keep their costs down to a minimum. Read on for some great tips on how to do exactly that!

Choose Calving Season Carefully

There are two options for calving your cows. You can prepare the cows so that they are ready to calf in either spring or in the summer. Some farmers choose the former option, as it gives them a chance to sell young cows as early as in the fall. However, it is also a very expensive time to calf, as you need to invest significantly to ensure the calves survive the cold spring weather. The cheapest option is to calf your cows in the summer, once the summer is favorable, and the pastures are green providing plenty of food.

Image from Pixabay

Image from Pixabay

Research Winter Food Options

It’s cheap to feed cattle and livestock in the summer, as they can help themselves to as much grass in the fields as they like. However, when your livestock is all inside for the winter, you will need to pay for food. It’s a good idea to research the different animal feed companies in your area to see who can offer the best deal. You can also prepare your own food from any grass that is cut down on your land in the summer can be dried and turned to hay.

Pick The Best Breeds

Each breed of cattle, sheep, and pig has been bred to withstand different climates and conditions. For example, Highland Cattle have thick coats so that they can survive in very low temperatures. Some cows have been bred for warmer climates and have very thin coats. Ideally, you need to pick the breeds that are best suited to your climate and conditions. Picking the wrong breeds could make it difficult for them to survive, and you could end up replacing your animals frequently.

Image from Pixabay

Image from Pixabay

Splitting Livestock Into Small Herds

It is a bad idea to split your livestock into small herds. These are often very difficult to manage and can lead to many mistakes being made. It will increase your labor costs, and you will also be using all of your pastures and grazing areas at all times, making pasture rotation almost impossible. If you combine all your herds, you will be saving a lot of time, money, and pasture space.

There are ways around very high livestock costs. These tips are just a few of the different ways you can prevent spending too much. And the success of your farm will increase as a result!

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Nicole Caldwell

Nicole Caldwell is a self-taught environmentalist, green-living savant and sustainability educator with more than a decade of professional writing experience. She is also the co-founder of Better Farm and president of betterArts. Nicole’s work has been featured in Mother Earth News, Reader’s Digest, Time Out New York, and many other publications. Her first book, Better: The Everyday Art of Sustainable Living, is due out this July through New Society Publishers.

Working Animals on the Farm: Essential Considerations

Working Animals on the Farm: Essential Considerations

Technically, any animal you have on your farm is working in some way, unless it's a pet. Chickens give you eggs and cows dairy, while it might be the job of other animals to grow up big and healthy for meat production. However, some are more working animals than others and know how to take instruction from you. You might have working dogs, horses, and even goats to help you around the farm. If you don't, it might be something you're considering to make some farm work a little easier. Before you bring any working animals onto your farm, you probably want to think about some key issues.

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Move Your Farm Off-Grid With These 4 Alternative Power Sources

Move Your Farm Off-Grid With These 4 Alternative Power Sources

Whether it’s through a desire to be greener, reduce energy bills or simply have another source of energy so you’re not over reliant on one, many farms are looking into different options for alternative energy sources. With a myriad of different choices out there, you may want to combine two or more of these options as a way of generating all the energy you need to power your farm.

Here are a few of the different energy options you have.

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Starting Seeds in Winter for a Spring Garden

Starting Seeds in Winter for a Spring Garden

January and February might be uneventful months for most people. However, they are exciting for gardeners who are devoted to seeds. If you’ve never grown your own plants from seeds before, winter might seem like an odd time to garden. But, in fact, the timing is perfect. Gardeners who start their vegetables, herbs, and flowers from seeds typically start them indoors during the cold months.

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Healthy Superfoods to Include in Your Daily Diet

Healthy Superfoods to Include in Your Daily Diet

Surveys show that more than 60 percent of the US population consumes a diet that is high in saturated fats, added sugars, and sodium. Along with being high in calories, unhealthy diets are also missing essential vitamins and nutrients. One of the studies found that if you eat poorly, don’t exercise, smoke, and drink, you are three times more likely to die from a cardiovascular disease.

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The Farmer's Breakfast Has Been Given a Makeover

The Farmer's Breakfast Has Been Given a Makeover

We’re in the middle of February, and that means we’re nearing the end of winter and gearing up for, what we hope will be, a quick spring and long summer. This means we can enjoy the return of farmer’s markets once more. All those fresh and locally sourced products readily available to make all those childhood dishes we remember like yesterday’s dinner. However, it is not the traditional nor the dinner that we are about to delve into and shed some morning sunlight on because we are going to show you exactly how inventive you can get with breakfasts. There are so many delicious and nutritious options available to you, that we’re not going to delay any longer.

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This Sustainable Farm Sanctuary and Art Center is Every Eco-Lover’s Dream

This Sustainable Farm Sanctuary and Art Center is Every Eco-Lover’s Dream

It began in 1970 with a field and a dream. Better Farm is a sustainability education center, artists’ colony, animal sanctuary, and a 65-acre organic farm located in Redwood, NY. It was founded on the idea that every experience is an opportunity for personal growth. The farm has since become a safe haven for artists, activists, and abused and neglected animals alike; a place where everything from deer to horses, wild birds, dogs, mice, and over a dozen “rescue” chickens have been rehabilitated.

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Storms, Rain & Hurricanes: Planning for Natural Occurences on Your Farm

Storms, Rain & Hurricanes: Planning for Natural Occurences on Your Farm

When you run a farm, there are plenty of problems that you can potentially face. For a start, you’re exposed to the elements. Throughout the year, you might have to deal with storms, rain and hurricanes, not to mention snow, ice and earthquakes. Where you are located will determine which of these natural occurrences will prove most of a threat to your farm. But it’s worth being prepared for them. Read the information below to plan for potential problems.

 

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4 Reasons to Buy Your Produce Locally Instead of Going to a Supermarket

Image from Pexels

Image from Pexels

Many people are scared of what they eat. Does it contain chemicals? Does it contain additives? Is it even safe to eat? These are types of questions that far too many people ask and as a result, they’re scared about eating specific foods or jumping on diet trains that may or may not work.

For whatever reason, it seems that common sense tends to escape our reasoning. This is mainly because of market trends, brands and supermarket stores dampening our ability to think for ourselves with their flashy signs, addictive musical jingles and “massive sales!” billboards. Fortunately, not everyone has been indoctrinated by these marketing schemes, and there’s still plenty of reason why you should buy your produce locally instead of risking you and your family’s health by buying from a supermarket.

1. You know the source

There are some regulations that surround the use of the words “all natural” or “sourced from”, but a lot of that can be avoided and there are loopholes that allow companies to effectively trick consumers into believing that their produce comes from a certain region or country. Add to that the unlikelihood of “fresh” produce being shipped from another country and still retaining its natural taste and nutrients without some kind of chemical or synthetic intervention.

If you buy from local markets and farmers, you understand where the product comes from and because there’s no lengthy transportation process, you can be sure that whatever the farmer is selling, it’s fresh and full of healthy nutrients that aren’t affected by chemicals and pesticides.

2. You support local farmers

Farming is a dying business due to the rise of unnatural and synthetic means to produce crops. Large corporations are buying up acres of land and draining them of natural nutrients in the soil due to the use of chemicals, and because these big corporate farms aren’t varying the produce, it invites pests that love to snack on specific crops. Their way of dealing with those pests? More chemicals!

By supporting local family farms, you help to maintain traditional green farming that is both sustainable and good for the environment.

Image from Pexels

Image from Pexels

3. It tastes amazing

Fresh food always tastes better. Meat, vegetables and fruits are best when they are fresh from the source, and you can’t get any closer to the source than buying from a farm. There are delicious PaleoHacks recipes that are both healthier and taste better when you use fresh farm ingredients as opposed to packaged junk from a supermarket. Fresh food will do wonders for your diet, and you’ll be surprised at how great fresh food tastes when you try it compared to the supermarket varieties.

4. It builds a community

When you support local farmers, you support a community. Food always brings communities together, and nothing supports that sense of being part of a larger community than helping them out. Buy from the farmers, make delicious food, and share it with your friends and family so that they learn to love fresh local produce. You can learn about agriculture, learn why their produce tastes better, and even invite your children onto their farm (with permission) to teach them the joys of sustainable living.